Blueberry chocolate self saucing pudding

Blueberry chocolate cobbler pud

Like with most baked puddings, this blueberry chocolate self saucing pudding promises sweet comfort. It is, as you see it. Devilish dark chocolate sauce, craggy topped cake and a handful of virtuous juicy blueberries.

Blueberry chocolate cobbler pud

Almost everyone I know has a self-saucing pudding recipe, either passed on by their mothers or given to them by a friend who doesn’t mind spilling family secrets. My mother makes an ethereally light lemon self-saucer and a gingery bake that’s slightly dense but glorious nonetheless. When I first started my cooking classes, I remember making a black forest baked pudding with fresh cherries and chocolate chunks. The sauce was laced with liqueur. There were a lot of very happy ladies going home that day!

The latest addition to the pudding club is this rustic charmer. There a couple of tweaks to the recipe. To the batter I add almond meal, for a nuttier taste, and buttermilk, which makes the cake part a little lighter. Before scraping the batter into the pan, I cover the base with fresh blueberries. As the pudding bakes, the blueberries seep their purplish juices into the sauce. As for the sauce, it’s possibly the best example of reverse baking principles. The liquid is poured over the top and settles on the bottom, once baked. Quite simply, a pudding marvel. As for the method, it’s straight-forward wet to dry mix and bake.

When you make it, remember to snap a pic and share it on social media with the hashtag #bibbyskitchen. We’d love to see what your making in your kitchen.

Blueberry chocolate cobbler pud
Blueberry chocolate self saucing pudding

Serves 8-10

  • 1  1/2 cups blueberries
  • 150g (1 cup) cake wheat flour
  • 100g (1/2 cup) almond flour
  • 75g (1/3 cup) castor sugar
  • 2.5ml (1/2 teaspoon) fine salt
  • 5ml (1 teaspoon) baking powder
  • 2.5ml (1/2 teaspoon) bicarbonate of soda
  • 90ml (6 tablespoons) cocoa powder
  • 125ml (1/2 cup) buttermilk
  • 125ml (1/2 cup) full cream milk
  • 60ml (1/4 cup) melted butter
  • 5ml (1 teaspoon) vanilla extract
  • 250ml (1 cup) tightly packed Natura Sugars Light Muscovado sugar
  • 500ml (2 cups) hot water
  • whipped cream and chocolate shavings, to serve

 

  1. Preheat the oven to 180º C. Grease a 25cm baking dish with butter. Scatter 1 cup of blueberries on the base, reserving the rest for later.
  2. Sift together the cake flour, almond flour, castor sugar, salt, baking powder, bicarbonate of soda and 3 tablespoons cocoa.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the buttermilk, milk, butter and vanilla. Add the wet to the dry and mix to combine. Dollop the batter over the blueberries, spreading the mixture gently over the top.
  4. Sift the remaining 3 tablespoons cocoa into a small bowl. Add the muscovado sugar and mix to combine. Sprinkle the cocoa sugar over the batter. Pour the hot water over the top. Bake for 40-45 minutes. Rest for at 10-15 minutes before serving.
  5. Serve with softly whipped cream, or ice cream, the remaining blueberries and chocolate shavings.

 

For pudding lovers, here are several more irresistible dessert recipes:

Cookie crumble sticky toffee pudding

Spiced Cape Brandy Pudding aka Tipsy Tart

Caramel malva pudding with cognac pears

 

 

4 Comments. Leave new

  • Oh, this looks divine but I have to be gluten free. Do you have any experience with gluten free flours and how I could substitute the self raising flour? Anyone? Thank you!

  • Dianne Bibby
    11 April 2020 11:20 am

    Hello Alene. There are a host of different gluten free options, each with a different flavour profile. When replacing with gluten free flours, I usually do a combination of as some have a very strong or overwhelming taste. Depending on what you have available, here’s what I’d do. Split it 50/50 or in thirds. Eg Half almond flour, half oat flour or third of each: almond, buckwheat and oat.
    Here are some alternatives – Buckwheat, cassava flour, chickpea flour, almond, oat – certified gluten free, millet flour, brown rice flour, teff, coconut flour.

  • Can the sugars be replaced by coconut sugar or honey?

  • I’ve only made it with castor sugar and demerara before, but if I were to substitute, I’d say half honey, half coconut sugar for the batter and coconut sugar for sprinkling over the top.

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